James Brotheridge Falls Behind
'It's Alaska! Set in Alaska!' shouts Philip Carli, an accomplished silent film accompanist, as he intently watches a flickering black-and-white drama with about 150 fellow scholars and enthusiasts. They know only the film's year of release — 1925 — and the plot unfolding before them: a plucky female detective trying to bust a gang of bootleggers in timber country. The audience is encouraged to yell out possible settings, actor names and even car models — anything that might help identify the film.
donnerpartyofone:

FUCKING ARCHIE.

donnerpartyofone:

FUCKING ARCHIE.

'Orphan Black's' Tatiana Maslany Fight Zombies as 'Shaun of the Dead' - x

shelterfromthesmoke:

ARE YOU TO ROCK?

shelterfromthesmoke:

ARE YOU TO ROCK?

Tsunayoshi duly set about authoring his Edict for Loving All Living Things. Dogs were henceforth to be addressed as O-inu sama (Honourable Mr. Dog) and accorded burial rites matching their station.
Stephen Mansfield. Tokyo: A Cultural History.
Miscavige keeps a number of dogs, including five beagles. He had blue vests made up for each of them, with four stripes on the shoulder epaulets, indicating the rank of Sea Org Captain. He insists that people salute the dogs as they parade by.
Lawrence Wright. Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief.

classictrek:

Here, I fixed this scene from “Bread and Circuses” for you Tumblr types.

tomewing:

pitbull:

Can you party to my rules?? 

Pitbull has an exciting future in corporate brochure design should the pop star thing ever go sour.

tomewing:

pitbull:

Can you party to my rules?? 

Pitbull has an exciting future in corporate brochure design should the pop star thing ever go sour.

Paging through the journal confirms that he read certain books simply because they were there. How else to explain entries for “Sumo: From Rite to Sport,” by P. L. Cuyler (“Author doesn’t admit there’s something ridiculous about sumo”); “Sport Supplement Review,” by Bill Phillips (“I was pleased to learn that creatine has no adverse effect on the kidneys”); “Hard Candy” by Andrew Vachss (“Still stupid”); “A Divine Revelation of Hell,” by Mary K. Baxter (“I was stuck in the clinic for five hours and ended up reading this whole book”); “Jackie, Oy!,” by Jackie Mason and Ken Gross (“He was born in Wisconsin!”); “Christina of Sweden” by Sven Stolpe (“Quite a character!”); “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the Russians,” by Vladimir Zhelvis (“Entirely composed of stereotypes, and entirely true”); “Sausage,” by Nichola Fletcher (“Overview of the world’s finest sausages”); “Pellucidar,” by Edgar Rice Burroughs (“The problem of gravity is never resolved”); and “The Great War: American Front,” by Harry Turtledove (“I refuse to read any more Turtledove”).
millionsmillions:

“[H]is authentic education as a reader began… at the Green Haven Correctional Facility, in Stormville, New York. There, he offered, he had read a thousand and forty-six books.” via The New Yorker

Endorsed.